Where American Tax Dollars are Spent?

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Do Americans know where their Tax Dollars are being spent? If 63% cannot find Iraq on the world map, probably safe to assume they cannot accurately answer this question.

How the Pie is Divided;

1. 42.2% = Military Spending

The biggest chunk of your money — 42.2 cents of every income-tax dollar — goes to fund the military. Over half of it, or 28.7 cents, goes to pay for the current war and military, 10 cents goes to interest payments on past and present military debt and 3.5 cents is allocated for Veterans’ benefits.

2. 22.1% = Health

The second largest amount is spent on health care initiatives, including Medicare

3. 10.2% Interest on non-Military Debt

About ten cents of every federal tax dollar is spent on interest for non-military related national debt.

4. 8.7% = Anti-Poverty Programs

These funds go to a variety of programs to help the underprivileged. They include food assistance, supplemental income for those with low incomes and assistance for foster care and adoption programs.

5. 4.4% = Education, Training & Social Services

These funds go towards paying for elementary, secondary and higher education. Other beneficiaries include employment training centers.

6. 3.9% = Government & Law Enforcement

This area covers a variety of programs, including the cost of running the justice system, the cost of running the Social Security program and federal employee retirement and disability.

7. 3.3% = Housing & Community Development

This money is spent on housing assistance and community development programs

8. 2.6% = Environment, Energy & Science

Spending in this area goes to environmental programs, energy exploration and any programs that deal with general science, technology and space.

9. 1.5% = Transportation, Commerce & Agriculture

One-and-a-half cents of every federal income tax dollar is going towards agriculture and transportation spending

10. 1.0% = International Affairs

The smallest amount of your tax dollars goes to foreign affairs, including foreign humanitarian assistance, conduct of foreign affairs and international financial programs.

The median income family in the United States paid $2,628 in federal income taxes in 2007. Here is how that money was spent:

  • Military $1,109
  • Health $581
  • Interest on Non-military Debt $269
  • Anti-Poverty Programs $228
  • Education, Training & Social Services $115
  • Government & Law Enforcement $102
  • Housing & Community Development $88
  • Environment, Energy & Science $69
  • Transportation, Commerce & Agriculture $40
  • International Affairs $27

uncle sam wants out

Read the Full Report from the The National Priorities Project

CNBC Slideshow

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Rental Cars and Winter Tires – Where’s the Traction?

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If you’re like most people in this country, you don’t have winter tires on your car right now. You bought “all-season” tires, and you figured all-season meant spring, summer, fall and winter, and so now you drive on the same set whether it’s plus-thirty or minus-fifteen.

You would probably be surprised to learn that “all season” tires stiffen up considerably at low temperatures, which makes them bad at gripping and good at sliding. That means that on ice your car will travel much further after you hit the brakes than it would have if you were on winter tires. And that can mean the difference between a near miss and a crash.

You would probably also be surprised to learn that, outside Quebec (where they will shortly be required by law), there is no way to rent a car with winter tires. Not in Ontario, not in Alberta, and not even in the snowy mountains of British Columbia. In this report, we ask two race-car drivers to do some test drives and see first-hand the difference tires can make to road safety. And Wendy Mesley asks why the people who market tires still use the phrase “all season.”

Read the Full Story and Watch the video on CBC Marketplace